Tag Archives: River

East Laporte

East Laporte

This photo was taken recently at the park in East Laporte, one of a handful of communities that make up the larger unincorporated community of Tuckasegee, North Carolina (near Cullowhee, home of Western Carolina University).   I’ve lived in this area most of my life and I know it’s a beautiful place.  Even as a child, I felt these mountains were a part of me, kind of mysterious, yet comforting, too, and now I really realize the river, creeks, and streams are part of me, too.   East Laporte is where Caney Fork Creek empties into the Tuckasegee River (alternate spelling Tuckaseigee).  The Tuckasegee River pretty much runs the length of Jackson County and eventually ends up in Fontana Lake.  Sometimes it’s just known as “The Tuck.”  If you saw “The Fugitive” with Harrison Ford, then you saw the Tuckasegee River.  East Laporte now has an area where you can get in the river to play and splash around (or throw rocks like my little granddaughter does), go tubing, have a picnic, sunbathe, fish, or just sit on the riverbank and take in the natural beauty.  The Tuck is a popular place for these activities up and down its length, and no matter where we go from Cullowhee to Sylva to Dillsboro and a little ways beyond, our river isn’t ever far away.  But I just learned something new about East Laporte community.   There was once a logging town there, a school, and its own post office.  Funny how sometimes you drive to and by places close to home and never really know their history; seems like we’re more interested in learning about places far away than what’s in our own backyard.  I had classmates from East Laporte and rode through there many times, but never gave it much thought.  Sometimes we don’t take the time to learn more about what we see every day, and maybe especially if that’s not where our family roots really are.  It’s not where my parents and grandparents came from originally; it’s not where I was born.  I realize now how silly that is.  This is where my children were born, where my parents met, where a lot of my family has been educated, and where some of us still live our everyday lives right now.   A lot of life, some beautiful, some messy, has happened here for me.   It may not be the county of my birth, but it’s home.  Our hearts are big enough to embrace lots of “home places” tied to memories, to family, to who we are, and to how these places make us feel inside.  So, no matter where I may end up down the road, this little corner of western North Carolina will always be a big part of who I am and of my deep appreciation for nature, the river, the streams, the lakes, and, of course, the mountains.  It will always be home, and I’m thankful for that.

~Sharon

copyright (c) 2016 by Raindrop Ridge Press

My Little Segment of the Rainbow

Even when you’re having a stressful day, riding down the road and around a curve, to suddenly see this brilliant display of a rainbow can just transform your day. This little drive along the Tuckasegee River is one of my favorites and always makes me feel good; the rainbow was the icing on the cake.  No matter how many rainbows I see, they still stop me in my tracks and take my breath for a minute. Nature seems to have a way of surprising me sometimes with something so fabulous and unexpected that I just can’t stay in a bad mood or an apathetic one. This rainbow was truly magnificent – I only wish this photo did it any kind of justice!  As Thoreau put it so beautifully, “The true harvest of my daily life is somewhat as intangible and indescribable as the tints of morning or evening. It is a little star-dust caught, a segment of the rainbow which I have clutched.”   A day where I can see something as lovely as this rainbow or an unexpected smile or the flash of a bluebird (and the list goes on and on) is a day where I believe I’ve had a bountiful harvest!  I believe this can be true every day of my life if I just open my eyes, ears, and other senses, as well as my mind and my heart.

~Sharon

 Copyright (c) 2012 by Raindrop Ridge Press

River Drive

Something as simple as the short drive to my daughter’s house beside the Tuckasegee River can be an awesome thing on a November day…..bright blue sky, midafternoon sun bouncing off the water – is that called sun dappled? – interesting-sounding word, dappled – some trees now bare and just dark lines silhouetted against the sky – some still with colorful leaves – fishermen waist deep in the water, some standing on rocks, and even one small boat with 3 men in it – and of course always the mountains and hills all around.  I wish I’d had my camera to take a picture or two.  It’s so easy to find beauty in Nature in the midst of everyday life, even with its problems.

~Sharon

Copyright (c) 2009 by Raindrop Ridge Press